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Jun
23

Midsummer Camping on Hadrian's Wall (36020)

Event Overview

Come and join us in rural Northumberland and explore the remains of one of Britians most wellknown historical sites, Hadrians Wall or as it's known in Latin: Vallum Hadriani. We will be camping at the base of the wall at scenic Winshields Farm.

Northumberland’s National Park is 'Northumberland’s greatest scenic treasure’. Stretching some 398 square miles from The Cheviot Hills, on the Borders to Hadrian’s Wall in the south. It contains magnificent wooded valleys and some of the most outstanding open moorland to be found in the country. 

Haltwhistle, the ‘centre of Britain’ is only a few miles from Winshields Farm....

Come and join us in rural Northumberland and explore the remains of one of Britians most wellknown historical sites, Hadrians Wall or as it's known in Latin: Vallum Hadriani. We will be camping at the base of the wall at scenic Winshields Farm.

Northumberland’s National Park is 'Northumberland’s greatest scenic treasure’. Stretching some 398 square miles from The Cheviot Hills, on the Borders to Hadrian’s Wall in the south. It contains magnificent wooded valleys and some of the most outstanding open moorland to be found in the country. 

Haltwhistle, the ‘centre of Britain’ is only a few miles from Winshields Farm. Steeped in history and retaining many historical features including old bastle houses dating back to the fueding times of the Reivers, the town now boasts northern friendliness second to none. Pass the time of day in this ‘olde worlde’ town, enjoy the wealth of local characters and the traditional high street which still boasts many family run businesses.

Also, the local town of Hexham, dominated by its magnificent 7th century abbey and Corbridge, a charming mediaeval stone village, are both well worth a visit.

Why not visit the Roman Forts of:
'Housesteads', incorporating part of the Roman Wall, it is the most complete Roman Fort in Britain.
‘Vindolanda’, a fort and civilian settlement with ongoing excavations of the site.

Kielder Water, set deep in the vast Kielder Forest, is the largest man made lake in Europe. It is one of Britain’s largest nature resorts and is home to the rare red squirrel, deer and some rare birds. Enjoy some of the activities at Kielder, including fishing, boating, watersports etc.

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What to bring

SUMMER CAMPING CHECK LIST

You don’t need a lot to go camping with Outdoorlads – sometimes ‘less is more’. The more clutter you bring the longer it takes to set up and pack up, and the less time you’ll have to socialise. We are a friendly bunch and if you are new to camping and don't have things like a kettle or stove, you should find others around you are helpful and willing to share. The following is useful advice:

Your tent:

You get what you pay for with these. A cheap ‘pop-up’ tent may suffice in better weather, but a proper tent designed for regular use is a good long-term investment should you get the ‘camping bug’. Nylon tents are light but can suffer condensation issues. Fabric tents stay warmer at night and cooler by day but are expensive. Alloy poles last longer than fibre-glass. A tent that goes up ‘outer first’ is very handy should you arrive in rain. Dark colours keep out the early summer dawn, but also attract heat in the day when you don't want it but then radiate it by night when you want to retain it.

Please keep in mind that space is sometimes restricted when we pitch up as a group. If you bring a tent big enough to sleep 6, but just for yourself, this may take up too much space. Also, we cannot always park cars right alongside tents so you may have to carry all your stuff a longish distance. The heavier your tent, the harder that will be.

If your tent is new or borrowed, it’s a good idea to pitch it in advance to make sure you’ve got all the bits and you know what to do with them. You don’t want to find out you can’t or don’t know how to pitch your tent when its dark, raining and windy! Essentials to have are outer, inner, poles and pegs. A rubber mallet is useful if the ground’s a bit firm.

Your bed:

An absolute must is some sort of mat, this will insulate you from the cold ground and provide some comfort from bumps and lumps. These fall into three categories – rigid, blow up and self-inflating (SIM). Of the three the latter is the easier to use, most comfortable and durable, but can be the bulkiest.

Sleeping bags are chosen for the season and compactness. Pay more for a lightweight compact model that’s also warm.  However, if you are coming by car and space isn’t an issue you can always bring the duvet from home! Keep in mind that temperatures at ground level can dip to single figures. If your bedding is marginal some thermal undergarments will be much nicer than sleeping fully clothed.

A torch, headtorch, or lantern:

Once it is dark you’ll need this to see what you are doing inside your tent, or for walking after dark on or off site. However, you don't want something so powerful it will wake up everyone else!

Something to eat from and with:

I.e. a plate, bowl, mug, cutlery. Again, if you are coming by car you can nick stuff from the kitchen at home, otherwise camping shops sell all manner of folding and stacking utensils. You will need something to clean it with. It’s a good idea to have a tea towel and some washing up liquid (or know someone who has)!

Something to cook with:

You will need some sort of stove, and something non-stick to cook in – a couple of pans and a big spoon or two. Gas can work out expensive in the long run. If you are going to camp often by car, then a petrol-powered Coleman stove will outperform most others and be far cheaper in fuel to use.

By heating things that are pre-cooked in packets or tins you can have a nutritious meal in minutes with hardly any washing up.

Remember you'll need food for breakfast, the daytime activities, and your evening meals.

Other things:

Don't forget your wash kit, shaver, and a towel or two. Some items worth their weight in gold when camping: earplugs, insect repellent and sting relief cream, plastic bags, a kitchen paper roll, a piece of string 3m long to make a washing line for drying stuff, a few clothes pegs, a second pair of trainers or sandals for walking across wet grass or if your boots are all muddy, if you like a few beers of an evening and don't want a 100m walk to the toilet block at 2AM something to pee in ;-), last but not least a camping chair (otherwise you'll be sitting on the ground or standing!)

For your comfort and safety please be prepared for the anticipated weather and the terrain of the walk - keep in mind the following:

Boots:  Hiking boots are arguably the most essential piece of kit when hiking just about anywhere.  Walker’s should make sure that their boots are both waterproof and breathable, and provide good ankle support.  Boots should also be in good condition.

Socks: Proper walking socks keep your feet dry, and help prevent blisters.

Gators: Gators attach to the bottom of walking boots and extend to just under the knee.  They provide waterproofing for the bottom half of the leg, and are essential in keeping the feet dry.

Walking Trousers: (ideally water resistant and windproof) will be more comfortable than Jeans which are heavy and cold when wet.  From April to October shorts can be a better bet, but check the weather forecast and consider the effect of bramble and nettles on bare legs!

Waterproof Over-Trousers:  essential in any significant rainfall.  Breathable ones are best.

Layered clothing: allows you to quickly adapt to changes in the weather as well as body temperature e.g. a base layer or a cotton T-Shirt; a mid-layer like a micro fleece, or a rugby type thick shirt and, in cooler weather, an outer layer consisting of a windproof jacket or a thick fleece. 

Waterproof Jacket: essential when hiking in all but the calmest of weather.  You get what you pay for with these. Breathable fabrics are advisable.

Hat: essential both in mid-winter to preserve heat and in summer to prevent sunburn and heatstroke. 

Gloves: essential in frosty weather.

Small Rucksack: One that is comfortable to wear is essential so that you can use your arms freely. Place valuables in water proof bags inside.

Sunglasses: April- Sept: comfortable sunglasses enhance your pleasure and keep insects out of the eyes

Water: even in winter one can lose a litre or more of fluid by perspiration. If you fail to make this up, you'll get dehydrated which can lead to headaches and other problems. A hydration bladder is easier to use than bottled water, but higher maintenance. Water is available at the campsite but you’ll need containers to carry it to your tent and while out for the day on the walk.

Food: a packed lunch will be required unless otherwise stated. In addition, carry energy bars or similar to counter 'sugar lows'.

Medicines: If you have allergies, are diabetic, or have minor ailments don't forget these!

Change of Clothes:  A full change of clothes should be brought and kept in waterproof bags, as well as multiple pairs of socks.

Meeting & Times

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The campsite

Set in the heart of the beautiful Northumberland countryside, Winshields is a working farm surrounded by the un-spoilt beauty of Hadrian’s Wall Country. The campsite is an open site with some sheltered areas, on a gentle grassy slope in front of the main farm house.

The following facilities are available:

  • Toilet, basins and shower facilities
  • Dishwashing Facilities
  • Picnic Benches
  • BBQ Facililities

Extras

  • The farm can also supply a hearty English Breakfast to start your day and packed lunches to take on your way
  • Towel hire and Sleeping Bag hire available on request. 
  • On-site shop offering home baking and your basic provisions.
  • Twice Brewed Inn, serving real ales and bar meals is only 400 metres away

Pets

Pets are welcome at at Winshields Farm. OutdoorDogs that are friendly to OutdoorLads and other OutdoorDogs are welcome.

What's going to happen?

Friday:

  • Arrive from 5pm, pitch tents and relax after your journey. Cook, eat, mingle, chat and catch up with old friends and make new ones. There will be a short briefing around about 8pm then we'll relax and chat or head to the pub.

  Saturday

  • Day Hike: 11-15 miles around the beautiful Northumberland countryside.
  • Or, if you prefer to do your own thing there are attractions in the area such Hadrian's Wall and the Roman Forts. Kielder Water is nearby, set deep in the vast Kielder Forest, and is the largest man made lake in Europe. It is one of Britain’s largest nature resorts and is home to the rare red squirrel, deer and some rare birds. Or the local town of Hexham, dominated by its magnificent 7th century abbey and Corbridge, a charming mediaeval stone village, are both well worth a visit. Or try Visit Northumberland for other ideas.
  • Evening: After the walk return to camp, relax again, and either chill at the campsite or head to the pub.

Sunday:

  • No rush to get up at the crack of dawn, but we will aim to leave the campsite by 11 am.
  • For those not in a rush to head home, we'll offer a short walk to work up an appetite for a late pub lunch.

Event Reference No:
36020